xmdp-brainstorming

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It should be noted that none of these linking solutions addresses the issue of when exactly the microformat is being used in the document.  They only indicate that the microformat may be in use.
It should be noted that none of these linking solutions addresses the issue of when exactly the microformat is being used in the document.  They only indicate that the microformat may be in use.
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No. that is false.  Referencing an XMDP introduces its definitions into the document.  Period.  Those definitions then take effect for the properties and values defined therein.
No. that is false.  Referencing an XMDP introduces its definitions into the document.  Period.  Those definitions then take effect for the properties and values defined therein.
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[[User:Bud|Bud]] 20:06, 13 Jul 2005 (PDT): Again, a read of the text I quote above does not support this conclusion.  If it did, you could only use values defined in the XMDP.
=== Resolving when microformats are actually in use ===
=== Resolving when microformats are actually in use ===

Revision as of 03:06, 14 July 2005

XMDP Brainstorming

Contents


Authors

Add your name here if you make significant contributions to this page and wish to take responsibility for them.

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

NOTE: This page is currently a bit of a mishmash of xmdp-faq , xmdp-issues, and XMDP brainstorming. I'm going to need to spend some time separating all this out. - Tantek Çelik

XMDP brainstorming

Introduction

Tantek Çelik has developed the <a href="http://gmpg.org/xmdp/" title="XHTML Meta-data Profile">XMDP</a> to define extensions to XHTML including rel values, class names, and <meta name> properties and values. Per the XMDP spec, a link to a microformat's XMDP in the profile attribute of head element indicates that that microformat's vocabulary is formally defined in the document. A parser could read the allowed attribute values from the linked XMDP and use their presence in the document to infer that that particular microformat was in use.

Raised Issues

This specification does not define a set of legal meta data properties. The meaning of a property and the set of legal values for that property should be defined in a reference lexicon called a profile. For example, a profile designed to help search engines index documents might define properties such as "author", "copyright", "keywords", etc.

does not imply exclusivity for the whole document, only for the part covered by the profile. If it implied exclusivity for the whole document, then only defined attribute values could be used for the whole document. A reference with a neutrally stated explanation would help here.

Feel free to add issues here. Keep issues in this list in summary form. Save lengthy discussion and potential solutions for elaboration below.

Addressing issues

These are in no particular order, but an issue should appear in the issues list above if it is addressed here.

Linking to the XMDP

There are at least two additional methods under discussion for linking to the XMDP in addition to the current method of using the profile attribute of the head element:

It should be noted that none of these linking solutions addresses the issue of when exactly the microformat is being used in the document. They only indicate that the microformat may be in use.

No. that is false. Referencing an XMDP introduces its definitions into the document. Period. Those definitions then take effect for the properties and values defined therein.

Bud 20:06, 13 Jul 2005 (PDT): Again, a read of the text I quote above does not support this conclusion. If it did, you could only use values defined in the XMDP.

Resolving when microformats are actually in use

One solution to this issue is simply to include the <a rel="profile" href="link to XMDP">powered by microformat xyz</a> within the container element for the microformat. The XMDP spec could then specify that when the <a> element is used in this way, it indicates that the microformat is used by the element containing the <a> element.

There are, however, several clear issues with this proposal:

Parsing microformats

Parsing user-generated content is challenging. Frequently, it does not validate and may not even be well formed. Therefore, microformat discovery mechanisms that depend on documents having even minimal xml properties like well-formedness will often fail. This is true, in particular, of Brian Suda's frequently cited X2V hCard and hCalendar discovery and transformation prototypes which use XSLT.

However, most microformats, which tend to be agnostic about things like exact element type used, typically require that the developer resort to tools like XPATH that assume well-formedness. Mark Pilgrim's example universal feed parser suggests that it may be possible to sanitize user html to an extent that it is suitable for later processing as xml.

From a pragmatic developer perspective, parsing web pages to discover microformats is likely to be an area of much work.

xmdp-brainstorming was last modified: Wednesday, December 31st, 1969

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